Regent’s Canal – King’s Cross to Acton’s Lock

London’s hidden canal aqueduct! Goods Way – where the unknown aqueudct is sited. Canal at left, railway at lower right. The location at which the Regent’s Canal’s only aqueduct (officially called ‘King’s Cross Railway Aqueduct’) exists at King’s Cross. The crowns of the railway tunnels underneath the Regent’s Canal were built so close to the bed of the waterway the […]

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Regent’s Canal – Camden to St Pancras

The canal at the top of Camden Market. On the left is the Pirate Castle. The entrance 2 the disused Dead Dog basin is on right Note: Dead Dog basin gave boats access to an underground wharf which formed part of the Camden horse tunnels. Part of the tunnels on a lower level are open and this is actually to […]

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Regent’s Cumberland Turn to Pirate Castle

Towpath walkers and a waterbus at St Marks Gate bridge, near the junction from which the old Cumberland Arm began At the end of the Regents Park section boats turn sharp left for Camden Town. The canal once went straight on to Cumberland Basin near Great Portland Street A close up of the Feng Shang Chinese restaurant. This unusual style […]

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Regent’s Canal – Maida Hill to London Zoo

London Waterbus Perseus at the eastern end of Maida Hill Tunnel Marylebone Wide from Lisson Grove Road with Beauchamp heading westwards East Portal of Lisson Grove Tunnel with a widebeam heading westwards Lisson Grove moorings, otherwise known as Marylebone Wide. There used to be a very large interchange depot between canal and railway Plaque placed by Pateley St bridge commoreating […]

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Regent’s Canal intro & Little Venice – Maida Hill

The Regents Canal Following on the success of the Grand Union’s Paddington Branch, the Regents was opened to exploit the potentialities offered by water transport. It was designed by John Nash and named after the Prince Regent of the time. The canal was planned as part of a substantial new developoment around Marylebone, that included Regents Park. The course of […]

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Pudding Mill River Requiem – part three

The Pudding Mill River clearly extended southwards as far as the old bridge that formed a link between Marshgate Lane and a scrapyard to the north of the railway lines. This section remained in water until at least 1983. In redeveloping the access roads around the Marshgate Industrial area soon after that date, the extension of Pudding Mill Lane used […]

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Pudding Mill River Requiem – part two

Looking down knobs Hill in 2005 from the junction of Marshgate Lane and Knobs Hill Road. The dip under the Northern Outfall is obvious. Knobs Hill Road was named after the ancient prominitory known as Nobshill. The road also led to the warehouses known as Sun Wharves that were sited alongside the City Mill River. These were not wharves created […]

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Pudding Mill – Requiem for a lost London river

The Pudding Mill River (known also as Pudding Mill stream or Hunter’s Mill stream) was a major waterway forming part of the network known as the Bow Back Rivers. The Pudding Mill formed an alternative north-south route from St Thomas’ Creek (the southernmost west to east waterway which leads from the A12/A102(M) Bow roundabout to the Waterworks River) to the […]

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Paddington & its transport systems – 3

Paddington & its transport systems – 3 The Great Western Railway This was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel and it is interesting that his railway opened in the same year his canal bridge was built. It was in 1838 that these events occured. The railway itself was broad gauge of 7 foot and a quarter inches, and it spread across […]

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Paddington & its transport systems – 2

Paddington & its transport systems – 2 The canal – Brunel’s bridge: This was an early Brunel structure, predating the major works at Paddington Station by several years. The castings were made in Deptford and put together on site in 1838 and the structure officially opened in 1839. It was moulded within a new brickwork structure in 1906 and forgotten […]

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