Wey Navigation – Worsfold to Stoke

Worsfold Gates are brought into use when the river is above normal levels. Previously under the old Wey trustees and the Stevens family the gates at Worsfold and Walsham were operated at all times. Between Weybridge and Send the navigation consists mainly of artificial cuts, however from Send to Godalming the navigation uses more of the river. Despite being a […]

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Wey Navigation – Newark to Worsfold Gates

The Navigation splits from the river briefly as it passes Newark Abbey & the old mills. The priory dates from the 12th Century and was dissoluted by Henry 8th A winter view of the navigation by the site of the old Newark Mill. The mill had five floors, three waterwheels and eight pairs of stones. The buildings on the right […]

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Wey Navigation – Parvis to Walsham Gates

The navigation winds past Dodds and Murrays bridges as it heads towards Pyrford. In the early days the navigation met the river below Pyrford. The river has long since been diverted via Wisley, a couple of miles away. Quite a few of the delightful canal bridges have names and dates of construction. This is Dodds. Several of these bridges were […]

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Wey Navigation – Coxes Mill to Parvis Wharf

The imposing Coxes Mill towers over the surrounding countryside Coxes Mill, which has the fairly unusual distinction of being sited on a canal rather than a river. As history puts it, the Wey navigation’s last working boats operated to Coxes Mill until 1969 (with a short resume in the 1980’s.) It can be easily deduced that the remainder of the […]

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The Wey Navigation

The attractive cottages at Dapdune Wharf, Guildford. The Wey navigations begin their story when wealthy landowner Sir Richard Weston of Sutton Place near Guildford began to think of ways to improve agricultural and land management. Apparently (but see the notes later on) Weston had seen methods in use in Holland during his younger years and he decided to implement some […]

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The Royal Arsenal Canal today

Looking from the former canal entrance, across the coal pier, towards the Woolwich free ferry, the Thames Barrier, Canary Wharf and Central London. The flats on the extreme right are built on land where the Woolwich class narrow boats were once built. A look at the waterway The canal is today known as ‘Broadwater,’ but the name doesnt belie the […]

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History of the Royal Arsenal Railway

(The following section on the railway was kindly written for London Canals by Ian Bull of the Crossness Engines Trust) The Royal Arsenal’s railways began in 1824 with a horse drawn plateway that was regarded as complete by 1840 when it had reached 15 miles in length. It’s likely that it’s design was based largely on that of the Surrey […]

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The Royal Arsenal Canal – The waterway serving the Woolwich military complex

The Royal Arsenal (or Woolwich Arsenal) canal was designed by Lietunant Colonel Pilkington and built between 1812-14, and extended again by 1816. It had a dual purpose – one was to deliver materials into the heart of the Royal Arsenal military complex and the other was to create a defence boundary to the east. It does not seem that it […]

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Along The Roding (Ilford) Navigation

This navigation is still in use – sort of. From its confluence at the Thames it is known as Barking Creek, a winding, tidal waterway. Once it reaches Barking it is generally known as the River Roding. Today it is useable as far as Barking High Bridge Road, or somewhat further north with great care on higher tides. Water levels […]

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The Roding (Barking and Ilford) Navigation

From its confluence at the Thames it is usually known as Barking Creek, a winding, tidal waterway. Once it reaches Barking it becomes the River Roding proper. This is one of west Essex’s more noted rivers and rises near Dunmow, before passing through the Roding villages, then Ongar, Abridge and Redbridge. For around a century the river was easily navigable […]

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