Go Boats and the River Brent

GoBoats are saying hirers will be able to reach the River Brent. I dont know how they envisage this. The Brent at that location is one of the most difficult waterways in London to even try accessing! GoBoats must have looked at the map and said there’s the River Brent – it intersects with the canal. Looks nice and tempting. […]

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In Retrospect: Is the Lee Navigation a canal or river?

From Hertfordshire.com “The River Lee (or Lea) runs through Hertford on its way to London and it is joined in Hertford by three other rivers, the River Mimram, the River Beane and the River Rib. A canal called the Lee Navigation runs south from Hertford and barges can be hired for pleasure use. There are many good walks along the […]

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The Lee Navigation – Ware Park, New Gauge and Hertford

The final section of the Lee Navigation is just over three miles long. The course of the River Lea has been utilised since the weir below Ware bridge. The approach to Ware lock is actually a man made channel built to avoid the local mill. The navigation uses the River Lea for a further stretch after Ware lock before making […]

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The Lee Navigation – Stanstead lock and Gazebos

The River Lea conitnues to be used by the Lee Navigation as far as Stanstead Lock, after which it returns to its own artificial cut, straight ahead and no bends of course. The locks at Stanstead and Hardmead must be treated with care as they only have gate paddles and can easily throw boats about if the paddles are opened […]

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The Lee Navigation – Kings Weir to Rye House

Immediately after Kings Weir is Wormley, a popular mooring spot. There are good walks in all directions from here, from viewing the spectacular cascade at Kings Weir to the vast expanse of Hoyfield Lake and tracing the old Barge River course. Wormley has some shops and pubs on the far side of the level crossing The section through Broxbourne – […]

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The Lee Navigation – Rammey Marsh to Kings Weir

The 1835 iron bridge at Rammey Marsh Lock. It was closed recently due to structural faults Rammey Marsh is the second of two partially mechanised locks on the navigation. The first was that at Enfield. From here to Hertford the locks are entirely manual. As soon as one passes under the M25 above Rammey Marsh, they are at Waltham Abbey. […]

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Lee Navigation – the old order at Waltham

The Lee Navigation once connected into the actual River Lea for a short distance from a point just above the M25 at Rammey Marsh as far as the Hazlemere marina footbridge. From here one could indeed reach Waltham Abbey along a branch of the River Lea as well as boat upriver towards some wharves to the north of Waltham Bridge […]

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The Lee Navigation – Rammey Marsh and Waltham Abbey

The lock and 1835 iron bridge at Rammey Marsh. This section of the Lee Navigation was the last to be constructed outside of London, and the date on Rammey Marsh bridge gives the date of completion. It replaced the entire river section from Enfield to Waltham Abbey. Rammey Marsh is the second of two partially mechanised locks on the navigation […]

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The Lee Navigation – Brimsdown to Enfield Lock

The noted covered wharf at Brimsdown – the only example left in London on a through waterway. The Lee Navigation (actually as the Enfield Mill Stream/Turkey Brook) gently winds a bit for a change. Its difficult to avoid the industry along the entire length from Ponders End to Enfield – unless one hides the factories behind trees! The winding course […]

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The Lee Navigation – Picketts, Ponders & the Turkey Brook

Picketts Lock looking down the navigation towards Edmonton Picketts Lock is the first of the manual locks on the Lee Navigation – and what a big lock it is! It was improved along with all the others as far as Ponders End to enable barges of up to 130 tons to reach Enfield. Unlike the others, it didnt recieve an […]

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