History of the Royal Arsenal Railway

(The following section on the railway was kindly written for London Canals by Ian Bull of the Crossness Engines Trust) The Royal Arsenal’s railways began in 1824 with a horse drawn plateway that was regarded as complete by 1840 when it had reached 15 miles in length. It’s likely that…

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Pudding Mill River Requiem – part three

The Pudding Mill River clearly extended southwards as far as the old bridge that formed a link between Marshgate Lane and a scrapyard to the north of the railway lines. This section remained in water until at least 1983. In redeveloping the access roads around the Marshgate Industrial area soon…

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Pudding Mill River Requiem – part two

Looking down knobs Hill in 2005 from the junction of Marshgate Lane and Knobs Hill Road. The dip under the Northern Outfall is obvious. Knobs Hill Road was named after the ancient prominitory known as Nobshill. The road also led to the warehouses known as Sun Wharves that were sited…

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Pudding Mill – Requiem for a lost London river

The Pudding Mill River (known also as Pudding Mill stream or Hunter’s Mill stream) was a major waterway forming part of the network known as the Bow Back Rivers. The Pudding Mill formed an alternative north-south route from St Thomas’ Creek (the southernmost west to east waterway which leads from…

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A look at the McMurrays Canal sites around Wandsworth

Youngs Ram Brewery in Wandsworth, closed in 2006. The canal basin was sited just behind the works’ iconic chimney. Site of the canal basin within the brewery in 2013 (Permission was allowed by security to take these pictures from just inside the brewery gates.) A comparision between today’s scene &…

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The Surrey Iron Railway's Wandsworth, or McMurrays, Canal

Allegedly claimed to be the shortest canal in London, but debatable especially with the modernised Grosvenor canal near Victoria, The sole reason for the existence of McMurrays canal was as a transhipment facility between barges and the Surrey Iron Railway of 1803. The Wandle is perhaps one of the better…

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The Kensington Canal – West Brompton to Olympia

View looking from the bridge at West Brompton to Earls Court exhbition centre two. The interesting aspect of this picture is the railway bounday as indicated by the fencing on the left. This was the full width of the Kensington canal’s land. The large building on the extreme left is…

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The Kensington Canal – Lots Road to West Brompton

The council highways depot off Lots Road, built on the canal’s former alignment. The space between warehouses and railway (on far left) was the full width of the Kensington canal, around 100ft of it. However it was a tidal stretch and lots of mud was the rule rather than the…

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The Kensington Canal – West London's navigation

The opening of the Regents Canal in 1820 and its success led the way for a canal to be built in Kensington. Lord Kensington desired that Counter’s Creek (mainly a backwater for carrying sewerage into the Thames) was made navigable it would bring new trade to Kensington as well as…

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