The Romford Canal 4

Romford Canal – From Rainham Road to Elm Park The canal heads slightly northeastwards towards Elm Park along a much narrower Beam Valley The crossing at Rainham Road (or is it Dagenham Road? There’s often been some confusion over which name it should be since the stretch of road was…

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The Romford Canal 3

‘The lock’ to Rainham Road A depression is obious here, although there doesnt seem to be any trace of the lock chamber walls now, perhaps the stones were taken away and used elsewhere. Who knows, but this old tree stump that rises vertically appears to indicate perhaps a hard standing…

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The Romford Canal 2

New Road to Beam Bridge lock Dagenham New Road bridge (the Beam Bridge) over the Beam River, once a busy main road but nowadays most traffic goes via the new A13 Choats Manor Way futher south. Excavations in 1972 adjacent to this site revealed remains of the Romford Canal although…

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The Romford Canal

A waterway that took 65 years to plan & construct – and unfinished! The first plans for a canal to Romford were seen in 1809 and 1812 when Ralph Walker introduced proposals using a route from Rainham Creek with a length of 4 three quarters mile and six locks. An…

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Along The Roding (Ilford) Navigation

This navigation is still in use – sort of. From its confluence at the Thames it is known as Barking Creek, a winding, tidal waterway. Once it reaches Barking it is generally known as the River Roding. Today it is useable as far as Barking High Bridge Road, or somewhat…

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The Roding (Barking and Ilford) Navigation

From its confluence at the Thames it is usually known as Barking Creek, a winding, tidal waterway. Once it reaches Barking it becomes the River Roding proper. This is one of west Essex’s more noted rivers and rises near Dunmow, before passing through the Roding villages, then Ongar, Abridge and…

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The Isle Of Dogs (or City) Canal

The canal by where Canary Wharf now stands The Isle of Dogs canal as it was popularly known, was the third canal to be built in London following the Limehouse Cut of 1770 and the Grand Junction’s Paddington Arm of 1801. The City of London Corporation’s West India Docks Act…

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The Cumberland Arm

The Regents Canal’s long lost branch to the Euston/Great Portland Street area View of the entrance to the Cumberland Arm, with the chinese restaurant visible at left The Cumberland Arm served the market area and military facilities to the north of the Euston Road in Central London, and was about…

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Congreve's Hydro-Pneumatic Canal Lift – A Humbug!

┬áThe abortive lift scheme on the Regent’s Canal Before any locks were built on the Regent’s Canal, problems with acquiring a reliable water supply, forced the company to look at other methods of transferring boats from one level to another. This came in the form of Congreve’s lift which existed…

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