Pudding Mill River Requiem – part three

The Pudding Mill River clearly extended southwards as far as the old bridge that formed a link between Marshgate Lane and a scrapyard to the north of the railway lines. This section remained in water until at least 1983. In redeveloping the access roads around the Marshgate Industrial area soon…

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Pudding Mill River Requiem – part two

Looking down knobs Hill in 2005 from the junction of Marshgate Lane and Knobs Hill Road. The dip under the Northern Outfall is obvious. Knobs Hill Road was named after the ancient prominitory known as Nobshill. The road also led to the warehouses known as Sun Wharves that were sited…

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Pudding Mill – Requiem for a lost London river

The Pudding Mill River (known also as Pudding Mill stream or Hunter’s Mill stream) was a major waterway forming part of the network known as the Bow Back Rivers. The Pudding Mill formed an alternative north-south route from St Thomas’ Creek (the southernmost west to east waterway which leads from…

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The Limehouse Cut – first navigable canal ever built in London

The now demolished Premier Metropolis factory, Burdett Road, Limehouse Flats on the site of the Premier Metropolis factory ‘The Pier’ or whatever! Useful observation platform for looking up and down the straight section of the Limehouse Cut New flats at Bow Common Lane View looking west down the Limehouse Cut…

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The Limehouse Cut

The first canal scheme in London: The Limehouse Cut was the first navigable artifical waterway (the much earlier New River was built as a water supply aqueduct and not intended for navigation.) The Limehouse Cut changed in two ways – its link to the Thames and its level, were changed…

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In Retrospect: Is the Lee Navigation a canal or river?

From Hertfordshire.com “The River Lee (or Lea) runs through Hertford on its way to London and it is joined in Hertford by three other rivers, the River Mimram, the River Beane and the River Rib. A canal called the Lee Navigation runs south from Hertford and barges can be hired…

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The Lee Navigation – Stanstead lock and Gazebos

The River Lea conitnues to be used by the Lee Navigation as far as Stanstead Lock, after which it returns to its own artificial cut, straight ahead and no bends of course. The locks at Stanstead and Hardmead must be treated with care as they only have gate paddles and…

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The Lee Navigation – Kings Weir to Rye House

Immediately after Kings Weir is Wormley, a popular mooring spot. There are good walks in all directions from here, from viewing the spectacular cascade at Kings Weir to the vast expanse of Hoyfield Lake and tracing the old Barge River course. Wormley has some shops and pubs on the far…

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The Lee Navigation – Rammey Marsh to Kings Weir

The 1835 iron bridge at Rammey Marsh Lock. It was closed recently due to structural faults Rammey Marsh is the second of two partially mechanised locks on the navigation. The first was that at Enfield. From here to Hertford the locks are entirely manual. As soon as one passes under…

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