The Lee Navigation – Through Tottenham and Edmonton

The River Lea continues from Springfield Park past moored boats belonging to the local marina and the remnants of industry that gave the navigation some of its work. New housing around Ferry Lane has given the waterway a different chracter. At Tottenham locks the River Lea departs from the navigation…

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The Lee Navigation – Hackney Canal & Springfield

The River Lea leaves the navigation at this point. As one’s boat enters Old Ford locks, technically they are on a canal. This was known sometimes as the Hackney canal (or Hackney Navigation Cut). From here to Hertford its 24 miles – 19 miles of which is actually a canal….

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An introduction to the Lee Navigation (River Lea)

The Lee Navigation was actually built in stages from the 1600’s to the Mid 1800’s, with the main body of the work being undertaken in the 1770’s to build new lengthy canal sections to shorten the route between the Thames and Hertford The River Lea rises near Luton, and for…

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The Isle Of Dogs (or City) Canal

The canal by where Canary Wharf now stands The Isle of Dogs canal as it was popularly known, was the third canal to be built in London following the Limehouse Cut of 1770 and the Grand Junction’s Paddington Arm of 1801. The City of London Corporation’s West India Docks Act…

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The Grosvenor Canal

The former canal route from the Thames to Victoria The Grosvenor Canal was the shortest canal built in London. Its no longer in use, simply being a water feature nowadays than a working canal. It was built by the Chelsea Waterworks Company, whose premises were situated by the River Thames…

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The Fleet River from St Pancras to Camden Town

Having run past St Pancras church the Fleet heads towards Camden. Slight traces of the valley can be discerned here and there, mostly on an alignment to the west of the Regents Canal. The river was culverted around the time of the canal’s construction between Camden and Kings Cross. The…

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The Fleet from Kings Cross Bridge to St Pancras Church

Kings Cross Bridge – old street name sign on the side of the Scala entertainment centre. This sign can be seen from Kings Cross station (see below) A general view of Kings Cross Bridge. The Scala is on the right. There is still a ‘bridge’ here, it crosses the Metropolitan/Circle/Hammersmith…

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The Fleet River from Mount Pleasant to Baggnige Wells

At one time the Fleet river gently meandered between Mount Pleasant and Baggnige Wells. However by 1830 its course had been straightened out and that alignment now forms a large part of the alignment of Phoenix Place and Pakenham Street, and it is this alignment along which the Fleet Sewer…

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