The Royal Arsenal Canal today

Looking from the former canal entrance, across the coal pier, towards the Woolwich free ferry, the Thames Barrier, Canary Wharf and Central London. The flats on the extreme right are built on land where the Woolwich class narrow boats were once built. A look at the waterway The canal is…

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History of the Royal Arsenal Railway

(The following section on the railway was kindly written for London Canals by Ian Bull of the Crossness Engines Trust) The Royal Arsenal’s railways began in 1824 with a horse drawn plateway that was regarded as complete by 1840 when it had reached 15 miles in length. It’s likely that…

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Along The Roding (Ilford) Navigation

This navigation is still in use – sort of. From its confluence at the Thames it is known as Barking Creek, a winding, tidal waterway. Once it reaches Barking it is generally known as the River Roding. Today it is useable as far as Barking High Bridge Road, or somewhat…

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The Roding (Barking and Ilford) Navigation

From its confluence at the Thames it is usually known as Barking Creek, a winding, tidal waterway. Once it reaches Barking it becomes the River Roding proper. This is one of west Essex’s more noted rivers and rises near Dunmow, before passing through the Roding villages, then Ongar, Abridge and…

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Pudding Mill River Requiem – part three

The Pudding Mill River clearly extended southwards as far as the old bridge that formed a link between Marshgate Lane and a scrapyard to the north of the railway lines. This section remained in water until at least 1983. In redeveloping the access roads around the Marshgate Industrial area soon…

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Pudding Mill River Requiem – part two

Looking down knobs Hill in 2005 from the junction of Marshgate Lane and Knobs Hill Road. The dip under the Northern Outfall is obvious. Knobs Hill Road was named after the ancient prominitory known as Nobshill. The road also led to the warehouses known as Sun Wharves that were sited…

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Pudding Mill – Requiem for a lost London river

The Pudding Mill River (known also as Pudding Mill stream or Hunter’s Mill stream) was a major waterway forming part of the network known as the Bow Back Rivers. The Pudding Mill formed an alternative north-south route from St Thomas’ Creek (the southernmost west to east waterway which leads from…

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